Head to Toe Health

34 Avebury Avenue

Tonbridge

TN9 1TL

07549 559056

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Five Minute Fungal Nail Test

  • Easy to use

  • Rapid results in just a few minutes

  • No need to send nail clippings to a laboratory and await results

  • Scientifically proven to give accurate and reliable results

  • Can detect the presence of all the common dermatophytes in a small sample of nail

  • Immediate diagnosis, allowing you to advise accordingly and treat the infection without delay.

How does it work?

The Dermatophyte Test Strip works by a process known as immune-chromotography, similar to that used in a pregnancy test.  A pink line occurs in the test strip to confirm the test has worked whilst the appearance of a purple-brown line below it confirms the presence of dermatophytes in the sample.

 

How accurate is the test?

Published studies have shown to have an accuracy of 97% - meaning you can be confident that the test will give results.

 

How much sample is required?

Due to the sensitivity of the test only a small amount of nail specimen is required. In work conducted to date, less than 1 gram of infected nail can predict the presence or absence of infection.

Can the test be used if I have been using anti-fungal treatments? 

Yes, unlike traditional mycology, the test is unaffected by any anti-fungal treatments which may be present in a nail sample.

Why should I bother diagnosing it, I can tell by looking?

 

Studies have shown that even experts (dermatologists & podiatrists) at very best can only be around 67% accurate by visual diagnosis meaning they still get 1 in 3 diagnoses wrong. Clinical guidelines and published papers repeatedly state it is good practice to establish a formal diagnosis before treating. Why?

 

  • Because around half of dystrophic nails are not fungal.

  • Because one may risk treating (and charging) a patient for something they do not have.

References

Tsunemi, Y., K. Takehara, Y. Miura, G. Nakagami, H. Sanada and M. Kawashima (2014). "Screening for tinea unguium by Dermatophyte Test Strip." British Journal of Dermatology 170(2): 328-331.

Tsunemi, Y. and M. Hiruma (2016). "Clinical study of Dermatophyte Test Strip, an immunochromatographic method, to detect tinea unguium dermatophytes." The Journal of Dermatology 43(12): 1417-1423.